7 Live Chat Case Studies Every Marketer Should Know

7 Live Chat Case Studies Every Marketer Should Know

7 Live Chat Case Studies Every Marketer Should Know

By Guest Post

Do you want to convince your boss to use live chat software? If you worked in e-commerce you have probably read a lot of case studies. They are a valuable source of knowledge, because they offer some real-world examples, why and how businesses succeed and failed.

There is a number of classic cases that everyone knows, like Apple’s change of the name, Ryanair’s strategy to become the leader on the market or Microsoft’s push for real innovation that led to Bing. You will find a number of compiled influential cases, with recommendations from experienced CEOs as well as business school professors across the world.

There is however not a single compilation referring to live chat cases. We got for you a short review of some of the most interesting cases published on the web from private/public and nonprofit institutions applying the different live chat software, from the Sun up to the police department in California.

Consumers want e-commerce to be as available as possible and it’s quite true that some expectations can be set too high when an actual business comes into play. But as Sherize Jacob put it “if you think simply slapping up an online icon and waiting for the orders to roll in is all it takes, you’ll be sadly disappointed”.

Case 1: userlike/Titus

Key takeaway: money-value ratio and usability can be greater by using live chat than by using the other channels of client’s communication.

What happened: Europe’s leading provider of skateboards and fun sports equipment, with a great reputation for service and over 50 years of tradition starting from a small skateboard shop in Germany introduced live chat. It complemented the client service offered by the channels like phone, email, Skype, traditional mail or even by fax.  According to Pius Knebel, the leading eCommerce and online marketing of the shop, “the other tools just aren’t that handy for online shopping”.

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Case 2: comm100/the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA)

Key takeaway: live chat is a well-suited tool for communication for the young customers.

What happened: the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), non-profit organization introduced live chat to help its volunteers reach more people. Laureen Smolar, Helpdesk Manager, told Comm100, that “this new generation is chatting with us more than they are calling […] We have seen our numbers totally flip, and more people are chatting than any other contact method at this point […] So we are not just reaching more people, we are reaching them earlier. And that is crucial because early intervention makes all the difference”.

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Case 3: the Chat Shop/WastelandSki

Key takeaway: introducing the chat on the company’s pages can lead to reductions in bounce rate on booking pages.

What happened: Wasteland Ski was one of the leading ski tour operators on the UK market, delivering services to the 18-30 market. As the authors from the Chat Shop inform the company “wanted to begin generating a higher proportion of their site visitors into leads before investing in marketing to increase site traffic further”. They have reached 75% proportions of chats resulting in a lead and led to 1,000% reduction in bounce rate on booking pages.

Source

Case 4: netop/Redwood City Police

Key takeaway: live chat can be successfully applied in highly regulated public services.

What happened: police officers from the Redwood City Police Department wanted to provide the best possible customer service to the residents of the Redwood community. The City Police Department was the first in the United States to use live chat to enable the residents to connect with the officers directly to set questions and to get solutions for their concerns.

Source

Case 5: Live Engage/the Sun

Key takeaway: live chat can be the easiest form of communication for the clients while introducing the radical change in operational practice.

What happened: Britain’s biggest selling daily, the Sun, set the paywall in 2013. That has been a challenge for the readers and instantly for the newspaper, that had to react as quick as possible to a number of questions and to provide advice and support to the customers. According to Tony Heyworth from LivePerson, “the guiding principle was simple. The launch team was aware that readers would have many questions. Each and every query would receive an instant answer.” The Sun recorded 80% of queries addressed through the chat channel since launching the paywall platform (for approximately 250,000 interactions with visitors to the site).

Source

Case 6: TouchChat/Total Gym Fitness

photo credit: Levels via photopin (license)

photo credit: Levels via photopin (license)

Key takeaway: applying the live chat software can raise the level of online orders.

What happened: the of Total Gym Fitness observed a trend the less orders came via phone, the more traffic was on the website. They started to develop the strategy of convert more of the website traffic to order their services. After optimizing the site, as Erin Hogg, reported, the team “realized there were still components missing” and according to the Vice President of Marketing, “the team wanted to approach the website in the same manner the company has done with phone sales, which is a conversational-based selling approach”. As the company informed the “live chat and online engagement has yielded 39% of Total Gym’s overall online orders across desktop, tablet and smartphone devices”.

Source

Case 7: LiveChat/Tele2

photo credit: On-Line via photopin (license)

photo credit: On-Line via photopin (license)

Key takeaway: large companies can switch to live chat as their main channel of communication with their clients.

What happened: one of the largest Swedish telecom providers Tele2, providing network services for business and private clients, pushed to become the most value-oriented provider on the market. The company decided to introduce live chat as the main channel of communication with the customers.

Source

Disclaimer: the author has no stake in any of the services mentioned in the article and has no interest whatsoever to promote them.

 

Karol MojkowskiKarol Mojkowski, worked for many years in third sector engaging people in various actions; now in UserEngage.io, supporting SMEs in turning visitors into happy customers.


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